Placeholder image
Placeholder image

Workshops

Submission and Acceptance

Although, standard abstract submission guidelines and deadlines apply, some workshop conveners require authors to submit a short paper (which will automatically be considered for the EASM Best Conference Paper Award 2017).

We plan to run all workshops in parallel at an exclusive time in the conference programme. Hence, the number of contributions per workshop might be limited. However, if so, the Scientific Board in discussion with respective conveners will make every effort to cluster submissions according to their topics and place them into most suitable general conference tracks and sessions.

Format

Please note that we encourage workshop formats to differ from the “standard” format of conference tracks. Hence, the conveners will contact the presenters before the conference to inform them about the structure of the workshops, and to ensure a high level workshop experience for all participants.

Questions

For further details, about the themes of individual workshops, please contact the respective workshop conveners.

Rationale and Aim

Since the late 1970s, countries in the European Union have installed sport-for-all policies in an attempt to widen, and as such, democratise sport participation amongst their respective populations. The sport-for-all movement propagated the inclusive idea that everyone needs to have the same opportunities to take part and develop in sport, and this regardless of skill and ability.

Although sport participation numbers initially increased after the installation of such policies, numbers have stagnated in the last decades. Varying largely by country, most participation surveys indicate that about half of the population is active in sport and the other half is not (Theeboom et al., 2015). Non-participation in itself is not problematic since not everyone aspires to lead an active life through sport. More worrying, however, is that the group of non-participants is defined by particular socio-demographical and socio-economical characteristics. And that non-participation is not (solely) a matter of “lack of interest or motivation” but has structural causes which require structural policy solutions (Collins, 2014). People with a lower educational degree, people living in poverty, people with a disability or chronic illness, people with a (non-western) migrant background and especially those who are situated at multiple axes of social exclusion (including gender) continue to be underrepresented in mainstream sport (e.g., club sport participation). Moreover, there is a lack of sport monitoring and survey systems that are capable of including underrepresented and precarious groups in society. Participation research is often largely based on non-representative population samples, indicating that the level of non-participation of particular vulnerable groups may be even higher. Furthermore, robust scientific policy analysis frameworks and systems are practically absent.

It is sensible to assume that the highest gains in sport participation can be achieved by those groups that are systematically excluded. This will require a methodological shift from measuring to meaning, from mere data analyses towards a more grounded “mapping” and “deeper understanding” of sport (non-)participation. More systematic problem and policy analyses are required to better enable policy makers and practitioners to create social impact and enhance sport participation among those with least capacities to manage by themselves (Houlihan & Lindsey, 2013).

It is envisioned that the workshop will revolve around the following subthemes in particular:

  • Quantitative and qualitative research analysing sport (non-)participation in relation to different - intersecting - axes of social inequality (e.g., socio-economic conditions, race/ethnicity, education, disability, gender(identity), sexual orientation). In what ways are mechanisms of social in-/exclusion similar or contradictory for specific social status positions?
  • Research focusing on specific issues of non-participation in sport (e.g. access, drop-out) and the underlying mechanisms of exclusion.
  • Research focussing on non-participation issues related to specific sport provisions, or on differences between sport provisions. For example, what are the opportunities and challenges for community sport initiatives vs mainstream sport clubs and commercial sport provisions? Innovative research designs and methods in the domain of studying inclusion in sport in general.
  • Policy and discourse analyses in relation to sport-for-all policies and inclusion in sport.

Format

Conveners will act as discussants during the session and additional time will be dedicated to joint discussions including the audience.

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract
  • Short paper

Conveners

Inge Derom, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Agnes Elling, Mulier Instituut Utrecht
Reinhard Haudenhuyse, Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Marc Theeboom, Vrije Universiteit Brussel

Rationale and Aim

The aim of this workshop is to explore the nature of organisational innovation in Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) and stimulate dialogue about potential future collaboration between EASM and the International Platform on Sport and Development (sportanddev.org). The formal recognition by the United Nations of sport as a viable tool for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals has resulted in a proliferation of so-called SDP organisations. There is a consensus among scholars that sport and physical activities are neither inherently good or bad. Instead, whether SDP efforts result in positive outcomes depends on the organisations implementing these programs. A recent systematic review of SDP research indicates our understanding of the structures, management, processes, and behaviour of SDP organisations remains limited (Schulenkorf, Sherry, & Rowe, 2016).

Research in related disciplines have begun to uncover the multidimensional nature of organisational innovation among civil society organisations. This includes the use of new technologies, process-based social innovations, product-based innovations, and transformative new ways of influencing policy and public awareness. However, the ability of an organisation to pursue these types of innovations is influenced by a multitude of intra- and inter-organisational factors. Emergent scholarship on sport federations by Mathieu Winand and colleagues provides initial insight regarding determinants of innovation in a sport management context. Yet, SDP entities face several unique challenges compared to traditional high-performance sport organisations. This includes the combination of sport with various non-sport initiatives (e.g., education, job training, community service) and also operating within complex socio-political environments across low-, middle-, and high-income countries. It is anticipated that the workshop will stimulate critical discussions among researchers and practitioners on what is needed to enable SDP organisations to develop and sustain innovative solutions for fulfilling their missions. This includes identifying what funding agencies, external partners, and policymakers can do to advance this field.

We encourage contributors to consider organisational innovation from a broad range of perspectives including:

  • How SDP practitioners define innovation
  • Creative program designs
  • New organisational forms in SDP
  • Executive leadership
  • Local community perspectives
  • Creative monitoring and evaluation approaches
  • Critical intra-organisational factors
  • The role of funders and funding requirements
  • Creative inter-organisational collaborations
  • Organisational cultures of innovative SDP agencies
  • The role of environmental factors (economic, political, social)

Format

The workshop will combine presentations and a small symposium to stimulate dialogue about organisational innovation in SDP and potential future institutional collaboration. The conveners will open the workshop with an overview of the current state of the field and will subsequently facilitate interactive discussions among participants. The lead convenor will conclude the workshop by identifying key takeaways and areas requiring future follow up actions.

Research Videos

The conveners invite contributors to share the implications of their research for SDP practice via short video recordings that will be posted on the International Platform on Sport and Development’s website (www.sportanddev.org).

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract
  • Short paper

Conveners

Per Svensson, Louisiana State University
Marc Probst, Swiss Academy for Development

Rationale and Aim

Sponsorships are powerful marketing tools as they use the platform provided by sport events, teams or athletes to co-create value with various other actors, including the sport brand itself, media, fans, casual spectators, and other sponsors (Woratschek et al., 2014). Therefore, academic research has extensively studied the positive effects of sponsorships as a marketing tool and has been particular focused on positive image transfer effects from a sponsored sport entity to a sponsoring company (e.g., Grohs & Reisinger, 2014; Gwinner & Eaton, 1999). However, increasingly, problematic issues related to sponsorships can be observed including consumer scepticism towards sponsoring, negative image transfer effects for sponsors, and reverse image transfers from a sponsor to a sponsee. These emerging crucial challenges to sport sponsorship have so far largely been neglected by academic research. The increasing relevance of these issues calls for a deeper understanding of these phenomena and their consequences for the different actors involved, as well as the development of promising strategies to deal with them.

Recent scandals involving professional sports (e.g., the 2016 English football scandal) and mega sport events (e.g., corruption of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) as the governing body of football’s World Cup) change the sponsoring environment and emerging research demonstrates that perceived corruption of the event-governing body negatively influences the host population’s attitude toward event sponsorship (Kulczycki & Koenigstorfer, 2016). Moreover, the huge amounts of money involved in professional sports foster consumers’ scepticism towards sponsorships as well as accusations of doing harm to the sport, its tradition and its values (Popp, Horbel, & Germelmann, 2016).

Reverse image transfer can be observed as fans are even motivated to fight against particular sponsorships to protect their club from a spillover of negative associations. Social media has fostered such movements to jointly fight against “unloved” sponsors, including companies with a bad reputation (e.g., “Gazprom”, “Wiesenhof”), sponsors with unethical business models (e.g., payday loan lenders “Wonga”, “The Money Shop”), and sponsors that are accused of negatively influencing the sporting competition (e.g. “Red Bull”) (Popp et al., 2016). As sponsorships are regularly embedded in larger networks of multiple co-creating actors, problematic issues can also arise from specific actor constellations in these networks. Prominent examples of such issues arising from problematic network constellations are the consequences of rivalries for the perceptions and effectiveness of sponsorships. Recent research has demonstrated their relevance and highlighted the need for sponsors to consider the size and scope of out-groups when they configure their sponsorship activities (Angell, Gorton, Bottomley, & White, 2016; Bee & Dalakas, 2015).

With the crucial role of sponsorships both for the sport and within companies’ marketing strategies, it is paramount that scholars and practitioners shed more light on the above mentioned phenomena and further deepen our understanding of the effectiveness of sponsorships in critical environments. In addition, different actors’ value perceptions should be taken into consideration and image transfer effects within a sponsoring portfolio, i.e. among the sponsors of a club, athlete, or organising entity, deserve study. Finally, more insightful practical implications and directions need to be developed and strategies should be implemented.

Therefore, the aim of this workshop is to identify and discuss current problematic issues in sport sponsoring and to provide guidelines for sport managers and sponsors for the successful management and design of sport sponsorships.

Format

Tbd

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract

Conveners

Bastian Popp, Leeds Beckett University
Chris Horbel, University of Southern Denmark

Rationale and Aim

Increased in urbanisation and modern lifestyle discouraged participation to physical activity, that posing a major threat to public health. Nearly one third of adult all over the world are not physically active at levels recommended by the World Health Organisation. As such, improving participation in physical activity is a public health issue of urgent concern. Active design strategies support physical activities in order to address todays’ growing obesity and sedentary behavior. We can encourage lifelong healthy physical activity by preparing responsive and adaptive outdoor environments that reinforce self-directed movement experiences.

The purpose of this workshop is to bring together scientists conducting research in sport/physical activity management, public health, and active urban living areas from all over the world. Considering public health and physical activity management as a broader theme, scientists will present their latest results in physical activity/doing sport in urban open spaces with an emphasis on the application of their findings to perceive management needs. Public health policies, challenges for avoiding sedentary lifestyle and managing physical activities in different countries will be discussed in terms of the facilitating urban open spaces to promote physical activity and doing sport for all ages and abilities.

This sessions will be of interest to all researchers working in healthy urban living and physical activity/sport management and to all stakeholders and sport managers who need to make decisions about promoting sport and facilitating urban open spaces to stimulate physical activities for all ages and abilities. Managers will be provided with examples of how results from research can be used to develop and maintain active communities and address the issues in physical activity and sport management areas or to evaluate interventions for increasing the level of physical activities. Understanding the needs of residents in being active physically in a safe area for free and management challenges to address it is an essential component of developing programs, effective interventions and having realistic and cost-effective goals. Scientists will be provided with examples from managers on what types of information/knowledge are needed and how these results can best be utilised.

Stakeholders and managers will benefit from this session by understanding the scope of physical activity management research in relation to public health, what information has been compiled to date, and how these data can be used to address the challenges and goals. Scientists will benefit from this session by understanding what management needs are, and how they can tailor the presentation of the scientific results to address these management needs.

Format

The sessions will have a balance between short presentations, impact cases (applied research projects), debates, and possibly hands on activities in-between/around the sessions.

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract

Conveners

Roya Shokoohi, Hanze University of Applied Science
Kimmo Suomi, University of Jyväskylä

Rationale and Aim

There has always been discussions to integrate theory and practice, research and development work, university studies and real, concrete development work in private, public or third sector organisations but - especially in the past - not so often successfully. Nowadays researchers and modern sport organisations or other modern sport related organisations cooperate and use different means of sport business intelligence.

Conveners and a number of likely contributors of this workshop have worked in this area several years, but there has never been enough time to share experiences, success stories and failures, discuss together or perhaps prepare new collaborative and international projects together. It is necessary that not only research in general and sport business intelligence in particular serve the society but also use resources more efficiently in the future.

Sport business intelligence can be defined as systematic and continuous collection and analysis of relevant data in order to develop sport organisations and events (http://sportbusinessschoolfinland.com/sbsf/sport-business-intelligence). Sport Business Intelligence is relatively new approach to sport management, and we strongly believe that successful business performance development in sport organisations requires professional business management applied with business intelligence solutions where customers, fans, partners, sports brands, and organisation's business competences are at focus.

Our aim is to bring together professionals from sport business intelligence area, share positive and negative experiences, improve sometimes too theoretical reputation of scientists and increase also that way the possibilities of researchers and scientists to start or develop activities with the professional sport management field. We want to bring together those the most practice and concrete development work oriented scientists, who have already got concrete results out of their sport business intelligence related research and activities.

The conveners envision a mix of researchers, software providers and practitioners straight from the area of business intelligence and speakers who apply the ideas and concepts of sport business intelligence in their work. For example, the founder and CEO of Webropol, Erik Romar, will be invited as industry guest to present and also to comment papers and presentations of the sessions.

Format

The workshop will embrace a variety of presentation, input, discussion and documentation formats.

It is envisioned that active discussions continue and emerge over the duration of the whole conference, including breaks and social events. Every conference evening the main results and achievements of the workshop and discussions will be published by the means of social media or sport business intelligence related website.

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract

Open Publication

It is envisioned that after the conference an open publication based on presentations from this workshop will be made available to all interested conference participants and beyond.

Conveners

Kari Puronaho, Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences
Risto Rasku, JAMK Jyväskylä University of Applied Sciences and Haaga-Helia University of Applied Sciences

Rationale and Aim

Academia, industry, civic groups, and policy-makers are increasingly recognising the significance of social responsibility in and through sport (Paramio-Salcines, Babiak, & Walters, 2013; Slack, 2014). Over the last decade, research into corporate/social responsibility (CSR/SR), sustainability and governance in and through sport has created a fundamental, mostly descriptive body of sport management literature. Walzel and Robertson (2016) identify more than 700 individual articles on the topic of social responsibility and sport published between 2006 and 2015.

The scholarly potential for sport management researchers lies in analysing current activities and leading ways forward – especially based on deeper theoretical anchoring and reflections on the dynamic developments of the topic and its application over the last decade. Amongst other, contextually embedded and longitudinal research is still in its infancy as are theory development and testing; insights into organisational decision-making processes; organisational capacity to respond to social pressures; the role of individuals as social innovation agents and entrepreneurs; and consequences of social responsibility for organisational cultures, for the integrity of sport and for public value (Breitbarth, Walzel, Anagnostopoulos, & van Eekeren, 2015).

This workshop is very closely aligned with the topic of the ESMQ 2019 Special Issue, which provides a notable opportunity to examine obvious gaps in the current body of knowledge and stimulate new approaches in a sport management field which has received growing attention over the past years. However, past research into the topic has been dominated by explorative accounts. Yet, ambitious descriptive works as well as more explanatory and critical investigations with empirical relevance aiming towards theoretical/conceptual development are most promising for our academic understanding, managerial impact and future research agendas.

At the same time, still a large number of publications are inspired by, and derive from, a North American perspective – both a North American framing of “sport” and of “social responsibility”. Hence, this research is prone to ignore the specifics of the European context: different sport structures/cultures; different routes of professionalisation/commercialisation; the importance of amateur/public/non-for-profit sport organisations; the political/civic/policy/cultural environment; and more general, the plurality of Europe with its rich and diverse identities.

Therefore, contributions to this workshop need to be explicitly concerned with a European perspective – i.e. they need a European “anchor”. This can be achieved by considering one and/or another of the following avenues:

  • On a contextual and empirical level, research can place sport-specific or directly sport-related institutions/actors/issues in the centre that originate from or mainly operate out of Europe.
  • On a theoretical and conceptual level, research can embrace theories, models or ways of thinking specific to/originating from European perspectives/philosophies/movements (e.g. Scandinavian institutionalism; social market economical thinking; critical management theory, etc.).
  • Comparative research is also strongly encouraged, i.e. where theoretical lenses or contextual/empirical matters are systematically compared either within Europe or where institutions/issues from within Europe are compared to institutions/relevant matters from outside Europe.
  • Review papers focusing on or mainly including European aspects and current issues are welcomed as well as work that is somehow concerned with how the European (C)SR debate has been “exported” through/within sport or impacted on developments elsewhere.

Format

Tbd

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract
  • However, authors who intend to submit a manuscript for the ESMQ Special Issue are strongly encouraged to also provide a short paper in order to receive early comments on their envisioned submission.

Journal Special Issue

European Sport Management Quarterly 2019 Special Issue (19.1): Social Responsibility and the European Sport Context
Call for Papers
Submission deadline of full papers: 30 November 2017.

Conveners

Tim Breitbarth, Bournemouth University
Stefan Walzel, German Sport University Cologne
Frank van Eekeren, Utrecht University

Rationale and Aim

The workshop will highlight issues and subjects related to integration, migration and multiculturalism. In this matter, sport is expected to play a significant part in relation to migration, culture and integration. Consequently, the proposed theme of the workshop is related to the present European situation, with a considerable amount of immigrants and refuges from, e.g. Syria, Afghanistan and Somalia, but also to the general and on-going global migration, to which sport should be related and understood, as a general global phenomenon as well as a concrete tool for integration and (multi)cultural experiences. Thus, the workshop encourages the submission of texts that focus on the managing of sport due to relation of sport and integration, sport and migration as well as sport and multiculturalism.

In addition, the workshop departs from a local project; “Sport Open”, which is a collaboration project between Skåne Sports Federation (Skåneidrotten) and Malmö University (The Department of Sport Sciences and the Department of International Migration and Ethnic Relations) with the aim to develop sustainable methods for local sports clubs to promote integration and the “contact with newly arrived refugees”. Sport Open is based on the experience of a large number of integration projects implemented by sports clubs in southern Sweden during 2015 and 2016. Through interviews, evaluations, student papers and surveys the project has gathered information about on-going local integration projects, which has been related to current research on sport, migration and cultural diversity, in order to develop a web-based method/handbook, which was launched in October 2016, with the ambition to provide advices, information and perspectives relevant to all Swedish sports clubs with the ambition to carry out integration projects, in a multicultural context. A lesson learned from Sport Open is that integration projects, in general, run the risk of being “ancillary events outside the normal sports club’s actions”. A more natural inclusion occurs when clubs instead welcome newly arrived to participate in their regular club-activities. However, this is a hard question, because of the inherent logic of (competition) sport, which divides individuals due to age, gender and skills.

Still, sport is normally held – fairly uncritically – to be a beneficial tool for social development. This attitude (ideology) has, however, to be critically challenged, by empirical standards and theoretical analysis.

Notwithstanding the local departure, this workshop will have, as mentioned initially, a global/European horizon and encourages and welcomes various local or international contributions to the workshop, which will challenge and test the links of, as well as the methods and the rationality, of sport, integration and multiculturalism. The contributions of texts to the workshop might be theoretically founded as well as empirically, and guided by practical experiences of integration projects, in local context.

Regardless the fact that this special workshop has a content and rationality in itself, the workshop should also be regarded as prelude to EASM 2018, in Malmö, and as a serious mode to initiate and encourage discussions that will formalise and construct parts of that conference and the theme of the 26th EASM Conference.

EASM Conference 2018 in Malmö

In addition to the regular topics and workshops, the 26th annual EASM conference (in Malmö) will highlight issues and subjects related to migration, integration and multiculturalism, including, but not limited to, the following: Sport’s impact on integration in everyday life; Ethnicity, culture and consumption in sport; Diversity and transcultural experiences and its consequences for sport; Globalisation vs. localisation… and the “glocal”; Transcultural development and sport; Sport in the mixture of gigantism and intimacy; Migration as a problem or opportunity for sport development. By considering these subjects – in relation to governance, policy, participation as well as entrepreneurship, marketing, finances and sponsoring – the field of sport management opens up for critical discussions, in light of for example heterogeneity or homogeneity, globalisation, urbanisation and traditions and social change. In this respect, the present workshop is, in parts, a vital fundament in the progress and the development of the 26th EASM Conference, to be held in Malmö.

Format

The workshop welcomes and encourages different categories of texts; it might be an outline for an article, a pilot study, the start of a research programme, a local handbook for integration projects, case analysis as well as theoretical reflection, with a more general concern. The text could also be a workshop proposal in this academic field, which might be a candidate for EASM Conference 2018.

Due to the mixture of possible structures of submitted texts the workshop will be divided in different and functional tracks that, by necessity, are dependent on the outcome of the submission process. A panel, mostly from Malmö, the organiser of EASM Conference 2018, will guide and organise the discussions/seminars.

Still, one track will be the presentation of “Sport Open”, which will be critically challenged and tested, in light of other experiences as well as theoretical analysis. In this respect, the convenors will also inivite a number of practioners, working with sport, integration and multiculturalism.

Submission Requirements

  • Standard conference abstract

Journal Publication Opportunity

The Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, a referred peer-review journal, will in particular encourage and welcome articles in 2017-2019 that focus on sport, migration and multiculturalism.

Conveners

Johan Norberg, Malmö University
Bo Carlsson, Malmö University, bo.carlsson@mah.se

Our Partners: